Here are all of our church history courses that are offered at the Master's level. From core classes to electives, we offer a range of opportunities for students to follow their unique interests.

Church History Master's Level Courses

CH 131 Survey of Church History
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to the major movements and personalities of church history· 
  • To give students firsthand exposure to primary source material
  • To enable students to articulate the historical development of theology in an essay

Topics covered will be drawn from all periods of church history, from the immediate post-apostolic period to the development of Christianity in the modern world.

Spring semester, three hours. Faculty. 

Restrictions: Not available to MDiv or MAR students.

CH 211 The Ancient Church
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to the major events, personalities, and ideas that shaped the life and thought of the early church
  • To encourage students to think historically about the church’s past
  • To enable students to read the major texts of the early church fathers for themselves

Topics and personalities covered include the first-century background; the Apostolic Fathers; Irenaeus; Tertullian; Origen; Trinitarian and Christological debates; Augustine; the rise of monasticism; and martyrdom. 

Fall semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 223 The Medieval Church
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to the major events, individuals, and ideas that shaped the medieval church
  • To help students understand the historical context that shaped the development of medieval theology
  • To enable students to read the major texts of medieval theologians for themselves

Topics covered include the influence of Aristotelian philosophy on medieval theology; Thomas Aquinas; Anselm; Abelard; the pastoral theology of Gregory the Great; the rise of the monastic orders; John Duns Scotus; William Ockham; medieval mysticism; and the rise of Islam. 

Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 311 The Reformation
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to the major events, personalities, and ideas that shaped the Reformation of the 16th and 17th centuries
  • To encourage students to think historically about the church’s past
  • To enable students to read major theological texts from the Reformation for themselves 

Topics and personalities covered include the late medieval context; Martin Luther; John Calvin; justification by faith; anabaptism; the Catholic Reformation; the Anglican settlements; and the rise of Puritanism. 

Fall semester, three hours. Faculty.

CH 321 The Church in the Modern Age
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to the major events, individuals, and ideas that influenced the development of the church from the late 17th century to the present
  • To help students examine the historical context out of which emerged theological distinctions within the modern church 
  • To encourage students to reflect upon the globalization of Christianity 

Topics covered include Colonial North American Puritanism; the First and Second Great Awakenings; the history of American Presbyterianism; Old Princeton Theology; the Enlightenment and German Liberal Theology; the modern missionary movement; Fundamentalism; Evangelicalism; global Christianity; and the post-modern church. 

Fall semester, four hours. Dr. Van Dixhoorn.

CH 403 Asian-American History and Theology
Purpose:

  • To examine the historical-theological development of the Asian church in America
  • To equip students to understand the place of the Asian-American church within the broader history of Christianity in America
  • To expose students to the most recent scholarship in ethnic studies and Asian-American theology
  • To encourage students to reflect upon the usefulness of Reformed theology for an Asian-American context

Topics covered include the history of the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean American churches; theological contextualization; patterns of assimilation; racial discourse in cross-cultural ministries; single ethnic, multiethnic, and postethnic models of ministry; and a Pan-Asian Reformed theology.

Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 411 Nineteenth-Century Global Protestantism
See CH 711. Spring semester, two hours. Dr. Aubert.

CH 423 Readings in the History of American Evangelicalism  
See CH 723. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 432 English Puritan Thought  
See CH 732. Winter term, two hours. Faculty.

CH 433 Readings in Pre-Reformation Theology: Augustine, Anselm and Aquinas
See CH 733. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 463 The Life and Thought of John Calvin  
See CH 763. Fall semester, two hours. Dr. Lillback.

CH 483 God and Scripture in the Era of Reformed Orthodoxy (ca. 1560-ca. 1680)  
See CH 783. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 531 The Doctrine of the Church in Reformed Theology  
See CH 831. Fall semester, two hours. Dr. Troxel.

CH 563 Scottish Presbyterianism  
See CH 863. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 572 The Life and Thought of John Owen  
See CH 872. Winter term, two hours. Faculty.

CH 583 The Life and Thought of Francis Turretin  
See CH 883. Fall semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 591 Reformed Confessions and Catechisms  
See CH 891. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 601 The History of North American Eschatology  
See CH 901. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 643 Studies in Old Princeton Theology  
See CH 943. Fall semester, two hours. Faculty.
Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours.

CH 651 Old Religion in the New World: Transatlantic Puritan Theology  
See CH 951. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 661 Readings in the History of Reformed Thought  
See CH 961. Spring semester, two hours. Faculty.

CH 671 The Life and Thought of Martin Luther  
See CH 972. Winter term, two hours. Faculty.

CH 691 History of the Korean Church from Korea to North America
Purpose:

  • To provide an overview of the development of the Korean Church from its early days of Protestant missions until today, focusing on various challenges the church faced, including Shinto crisis, communist persecution, and the side effects of rapid industrialization
  • To provide a brief introduction to the Korean-American church as an important outgrowth of the Korean church movement in the 20th century
  • To stimulate both academic and ministerial interest in the study of the Korean Church 

Fall semester, two hours. Dr. Park.

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